Grant Cardone and Kevin Harrington

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Shark Tank’s Kevin Harrington— founder of As Seen On TV— comes on Confessions of an Entrepreneur and talks about his biggest business regrets. He says he needs two losers to get a winner. A successful guy like Kevin makes a lot of mistakes. To get big takes a lot of risk. One of the things he talks about is that he assumed if he got sales and profits everything will automatically happen. It doesn’t—you have to go and get the money no matter how much money your business is already making. Kevin discusses the fact that many times while he was profitable, he had no cash. Cash flow is the holy grail of business. You have to have capital to finance things. He had 100 million a year in sales and did 8 million in profit—but still had no cash because it was all tied up in inventory and other reinvestments into the business. Everything said, Kevin has no regrets.
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Star of Discovery Channel’s “Undercover Billionaire,” Grant Cardone owns and operates seven privately held companies and a private equity real estate firm, Cardone Capital, with a multifamily portfolio of assets under management valued at over $4 billion. He is the Top Crowdfunder in the world, raising over $900 million in equity via social media. Known internationally as the leading expert on sales, marketing, and scaling businesses, Cardone is a New York Times bestselling author of 11 business books, including “The 10X Rule,” which led to Cardone establishing the 10X Global Movement and the 10X Growth Conference, now the largest business and entrepreneur conference in the world. The online business and sales educational platform he created, Cardone University, serves over 411,000 individuals and Forbes 100 corporate clients throughout the world. Voted the top Marketing Influencer to watch by Forbes, Cardone uses his massive 15 million plus following to give back via his Grant Cardone Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to mentoring underserved, at-risk adolescents in financial literacy, especially those without father figures.